The Phoenix of Waste

 

The Natural Resources Defense Council  teamed with The Ad Council on this video to educate people about Food Waste.  Set to Michael Giacchino’s Academy Award Winning soundtrack from the critically acclaimed movie “Up,” the life of a strawberry was created pro bono by SapientNitro as part of a new “Save The Food” campaign.

It is part of a national public service campaign to combat food waste from its largest source — consumers.  We collectively waste more food than grocery stores, restaurants or farms.

ReFED, Rethink Food Waste Through Economics and Data, is a collaboration of over 30 business, government, investor, foundation, and nonprofit leaders committed  to reducing food waste in the US.  “The magnitude of the food waste problem is difficult to comprehend,” states the report. “The U.S. spends $218 billion a year — 1.3 percent of GDP — growing, processing, transporting and disposing of food that is never eaten.”

The “Roadmap To Reduce U.S. Food Waste By 20 Percent”, released by ReFED on March 9, is the first national economic study on food waste to develop a plan of action by this multistakeholder group.

The Roadmap estimates that it will cost $18 billion over a decade, or roughly $2 billion annually, to reduce food waste by 20 percent.  The economic value of all the food we waste is equivalent to $218 billion annually, so investing that one percent to drive a 20 percent food waste reduction can unlock $100 billion in savings over a decade.

The Roadmap focuses on the three most scalable solutions for each category:  Prevention: Standardized date labeling; Consumer education campaigns; and Waste tracking and analytics.  Recovery: Donation tax incentives; Standardized donation regulation; and Donation matching software.  Recycling: Centralized composting; Centralized anaerobic digestion; and Water resource recovery facilities with anaerobic digestion.

SKYLINE_07_be0cc220-c1f5-4e5b-afdf-818ba1f13ffb

One of the nation’s greatest success stories is Phoenix, Arizona.  By creating efficient ways to prevent wasted food, donate food and divert food waste, they are a leader in food waste management.

For example, during Super Bowl 49, hundreds of thousands of rabid football fans converged on downtown Phoenix for a week of partying before the big game.  Phoenix’s “Kick the Waste Initiative” was the perfect test for their pilot food waste collection and composting program.  By placing containers for food scraps and food-soiled paper in the 12-block perimeter of the party zone for the Super Bowl, they achieved a 73 percent diversion rate.  This is consistent with ReFED’s analysis, which finds that 73 percent of recycling opportunity is expected to come from centralized composting and anaerobic digestion facilities.  Through the same program, the city took the food scraps and soiled paper to their new pilot composting facility and three months later, they used it on city landscape and gardening projects.

In January 2016, Phoenix hosted the College Football Playoffs  increasing their diversion rate to 82 percent of the event’s waste.

The nation has a 50 percent food waste reduction goal by 2030.  Under a federal government initiative to lead partnerships between charitable organizations, faith-based organizations, the private sector and local, state and tribal governments, it intends to reduce food waste in the United States as an important step in improving  food security and conserving our nation’s natural resources.    http://www.usda.gov/wps/portal/usda/usdahome?contentid=2015/09/0257.xml

Then there is Jake Mace!  He has the best “at home” compost instructions on the web. You can follow him at JakeMace.com but better yet click on his link and learn how you can make the most amazing compost. http://i1os.com/How_to_Make_Amazing_COMPOST_at_Home!_by_VeganAthlete/5VIFtNCgv28.video

How You Can Help:

Awareness!

  • What are you eating?
  • How is it packaged?
  • How far did it travel to get to you?
  • How was it grown or processed?
  • Will you eat it or throw it away?
  • Can it be composted?
  • Make jam!  It’s a lot easier than you think.

Until next week, images

Garbage Girl

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s