NY’s Bottle Bill Joins The OWM Hall of Shame

A cheap drink made in Brooklyn that is polluting Brooklyn

How does New York’s Bottle Bill work?

New York State’s Returnable Container Act requires every deposit initiator to collect a $.05 deposit on beverage containers containing less than one gallon of carbonated soft drinks, beer, malt beverages, wine coolers or water, sold in New York.

A deposit initiator is the first bottler, distributor, dealer or agent to collect the deposit on a beverage container sold in New York State. You’re a deposit initiator if you:

  • Bottle beverages in beverage containers
  • Distribute beverages in beverage containers
  • Sell beverages in beverage containers
  • Act as an agent on behalf of a registered deposit initiator

Dealers (“retailers”) pay the distributor or deposit initiator at least a 5-cent deposit for each beverage container purchased.

Consumers pay the dealers the deposit for each beverage container purchased. (we pay $.05 to Pepsico and Arizona Teas to litter our environment with every purchase)

Consumers may then return their empty beverage containers to a dealer or redemption center to get their deposit back.

Retailers and redemption centers are reimbursed the deposit plus a 3.5-cent handling fee by the distributor or the deposit initiator for each empty beverage container returned.

http://www.dec.ny.gov/chemical/57687.html

What beverages are covered by NY’s Bottle Bill?

Carbonated Soft Drinks, Sparkling Water, Carbonated Energy Drinks, Carbonated Juice (anything less than 100% juice, containing added sugar or water)
Soda Water
Beer and Other Malt Beverages
Mineral Water – Both carbonated and non-carbonated mineral water
Wine Products
Water that is flavored or nutritionally enhanced

What beverages are not covered by NY’s Bottle Bill?

Milk Products
Wine and Liquors
Hard Ciders
Tea  hello@drinkarizona.com
Sports Drinks  there is no contact info for Gatorade
Juice
Drink Boxes
Waters Containing Sugar

Let’s look at what is littered on our streets from Gatorade and Arizona Teas.  Both companies do not have deposit agreements with NY. I encounter this litter everyday on my 15 minute walk to work from Clinton Hill to Downtown Brooklyn on Dekalb Ave.

     

Take a moment to learn which companies have deposits for your state. It makes a difference.

The consumer deposit tax is not the best system to protect our environment but that is a topic for another blog.

Natural Ways To Consume Electrolytes

Until next time,

Garbage Girl

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Jamaica Junk

These are a few of the items Martin found during our cleanup of Canarsie Pol in Jamaica Bay.  You have to wonder what happened to Marcus Nigel Nicholas.  Did Ashley Carvalho and Cassidee Bush need multiple copies of so many credit cards?  Did they contact all of those banks that the cards were lost? They all have security codes on the back signature strip. Are they legitimate?

When I Googled fake credit cards with security codes…I was impressed with how many ways you can get a fake credit card.

The FBI suggests the following Tips for Avoiding Credit Card Fraud:

  • Don’t trust a site just because it claims to be secure. The URL is important.  It needs to state https://.  If it only states http:// Do Not Use It.
  • Don’t give out your credit card number online unless the site is secure and reputable. Sometimes a tiny icon of a padlock appears to symbolize a higher level of security to transmit data. This icon is not a guarantee of a secure site, but provides some assurance.
  • Before using the site, check out the security/encryption software it uses.
  • Make sure you are purchasing merchandise from a reputable source.
  • Do your homework on the individual or company to ensure that they are legitimate.
  • Obtain a physical address rather than simply a post office box and a telephone number, and call the seller to see if the telephone number is correct and working.
  • Send an e-mail to the seller to make sure the e-mail address is active, and be wary of those that utilize free e-mail services where a credit card wasn’t required to open the account.
  • Consider not purchasing from sellers who won’t provide you with this type of information.
  • Check with the Better Business Bureau from the seller’s area.
  • Check out other websites regarding this person/company.
  • Don’t judge a person or company by their website; flashy websites can be set up quickly.
  • Be cautious when responding to special investment offers, especially through unsolicited e-mail.
  • Be cautious when dealing with individuals/companies from outside your own country.
  • If possible, purchase items online using your credit card. You can often dispute the charges if something goes wrong.
  • Make sure the transaction is secure when you electronically send your credit card number.
  • Keep a list of all your credit cards and account information along with the card issuer’s contact information. If anything looks suspicious or you lose your credit card(s), contact the card issuer immediately.

Until next time,

Garbage Girl

The Easiest Reuse Ever

 

My friends, Niovi and Sam, have hosted many a Coop party by using cocktail glasses that reuse their cocktail’s main ingredient; preserves.

They are definitely onto something as mixologists all over NYC are using this ingredient to add sugar, flavor and citrus to their favorite spirit.

Cocktail science is a blast!!!

https://www.epicurious.com/expert-advice/how-jams-jellies-cocktails-article

Until next time,

Audrey

The OWM Hall of Shame

I thought it would be great to create a Hall of Shame page on my header.  This will include companies who have products that create waste.

The example above is a single use plastic bag that is distributed every week with filler ads to our door X 6 units in our building.  Every week it gets thrown away.  The advertisers on the plastic bag need to rethink their PR.  Our building needs to post a sign.

According to http://www1.nyc.gov/assets/dsny/about/laws/posting-and-graffiti-laws.shtml, it is illegal for any person to place or allow to be placed any unsolicited advertisement where the property owner has posted a sign, at least five inches tall by seven inches wide, with one inch letters stating: “Do not place unsolicited advertisements on this property.” In a multiple dwelling building, each unit owner or lessee must consent to the posting of the sign. In a multiple dwelling building, the property owner may designate a place for the placement of unsolicited advertisements.

Violations of this section shall be enforceable through property owner complaint forms submitted to DSNY by property owners. The complaint form may be obtained on DSNY’s website or by calling 311 or visiting nyc.gov/311.

Fine: $250

I think I would like the job of enforcing litter laws!

Until next time,

Garbage Girl

Lobster Die Off Finally Explained?

Baby Lobster Die Off in Baja, California

Molecular biologist Hans Laufer, of the University of Connecticut, has discovered that waterborne chemicals leached from plastics and detergents seem to contribute to “shell disease,” which has caused huge dieoffs among lobsters of Long Island Sound during the past ten years.  According to University of Connecticut, after three years and $3 million invested in a research initiative, Laufer found that chemicals such as bisphenol A (BPA) are interfering with growth hormones in young lobsters, slowing their molting patterns and changing their development, which then leads to deformations, susceptibility to disease, and for many, death. This seems to explain a huge lobster dieoff that began in the late 1990s, bringing lobster catches to about 1/6 of their 1998 levels.

Continue reading

POPS, PCBs and Plastic Pellets

In 2005, Dr. Hideshige Takada founded International Pellet Watch (IPW) to track and study plastic pellets.  Pellets are the raw material that gets remelted and molded into plastic products.  Citizens across the globe collected plastic pellets from the beaches they visited and sent them to his laboratory at Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology.  The content of the pellets are analyzed to determine its global POP distribution. The results are sent to the participants via email and released on the web.

So far, pellet samples from approximately 200 locations in about 40 countries have been analyzed.  Five samples are analyzed from each location to see piece-to-piece variability.  About 1000 pellet samples have been analyzed so far.  POPs were detected in every one of those 1000 pellet samples from around the world, even from remote islands, providing evidence that plastic pellets transport POPs for long distances.

POPs are hazardous human-made chemicals that are resistant to degradation in the environment. Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), different sorts of organochlorine pesticides (e.g. DDTs and HCHs) and brominated flame-retardants are all POPs.

Analyzing plastic pellets enables IPW to observe spatial patterns of POP concentrations. For example, PCB concentrations were two to three orders of magnitude higher in highly-industrialized areas.  Even though, usage of PCBs was banned in the 1970s, they accumulated in the bottom sediments in coastal zones and rivers.  (General Electric caused The Hudson River to become a Super Fund Site by dumping PCBs into the water for decades).  Due to their persistent and hydrophobic nature, PCBs are easily remobilized by wind, waves, and currents, sediments stirred up by organisms, dredging and underwater construction.  PCBs continue to contaminate coastal waters by becoming absorbed into plastic pellets.

I googled plastic pellets and . . . . yikes!

https://www.google.com/search?q=plastic+pellets&oq=plastic+pellets&gs_l=psy-ab.3..35i39k1l2j0l4j0i67k1j0l3.165391.167158.0.168302.11.11.0.0.0.0.166.1252.3j8.11.0….0…1.1.64.psy-ab..0.11.1249…0i22i30k1j0i22i10i30k1.0.qqd1N-bxI3U

Until next time,

Garbage Girl

Where Does a Used Plastic Cup Go?

A plastic cup that was used once for probably less than a minute?  About 450-1000 years will pass before it decomposes in the ground.  That’s if it made it to a landfill.

Plastic is made from petroleum or natural gas.  Plastic production is estimated to use 8 percent of yearly global oil production—both as the raw material and for energy in the manufacturing process.  Because plastics embody energy from fossil fuels (and actually have a higher energy value than coal), leaving so much of it in landfills is not only an environmental hazard, it’s an unconscionable waste of a valuable resource.

If it ends up in the water, it will keep breaking down into smaller and smaller pieces that our marine life will ingest.  And eventually end up back in you.  If the plankton are eating plastic then you are eating plastic.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=97XpXhCgtEQ

Start saying, “NO!” to that plastic cup.  You will feel tons better!

Until next time,

Garbage Girl

Sebago Canoe Club Launches Boy Scouts for Annual Trash Bash

Martin and I were back at Jamaica Bay this past weekend to make another attempt at cleaning up the NYC side of Canarsie Pol.   We happily found ourselves lined up behind 4 Boy Scout Troops from Queens.  They were there to earn merit badges by participating in Sebago Canoe Club’s Annual Trash Bash.

The New York State Beach Cleanup has been run for 30 years by the American Littoral Society’s Northeast Chapter and is part of the International Coastal Cleanup campaign that happens every September.

890 pounds of trash in 48 garbage bags was retrieved, transported by canoe and deposited on the Sebago dock.  The volunteers counted and weighed their haul so that the effects of legislation on polluting our waterways can be measured.

We are so grateful to those who care about our marine environments.

Until next time,

Garbage Girl

When You Have That Plastic Bottle

More fun to watch the cleverness of this post!!!

Single use plastic should be avoided at all times to send a clear signal to the producers of these horrible products that are harming every ecosystem in devastating ways.

The latest evidence of the harm these bottles are doing to our environment is the saddest ever!  North Face and many other environmentally friendly companies have been making polar fleece from recycled plastic bottles.  The unfortunate truth of this process is that we need to wash these garments.  All polyester and polyester polymer fabrics release micro fibers from our washing machine rinse cycles straight into our waterways.  Civic filter systems cannot remove these tiny fibers.  Once in our waterways, they are ingested by oysters, mussels, lobsters and other marine life that we eat.

Can it get much more sad?

Until next time,

Garbage Girl

A No Waste Renovation

Last summer, I spent my weekends renovating a 3 bedroom, 2 bath house on what I call ” my island in the sky” in Southern Connecticut.  The house was in very good shape for the most part, but it had small enclosed rooms, as was typical for a home built in 1900. It now has the personality of a carriage house and a cottage.

I opened up the first floor by taking down a wall between the dining room and the kitchen bringing light and space and cohesion into the home with a half wall.

On the second floor, I made a larger bathroom that could be accessed from all three bedrooms without having to go through the master bedroom.  Instead of throwing out the dense, hard, old milled pine, real 2X4s from the downstairs demo, I used them to frame my new bathroom walls upstairs.  

I had more than enough nails of all sorts.  They came in very handy for every little job that needed one.  I have a lifetime supply of kindling for my fireplace because I saved all of that amazing lathe from the plaster wall.  Light fixtures were reused or came from second-hand stores.  The old vanity was saved and redesigned.   Tongue and groove wainscoting was refinished and reused. The original floors were rediscovered and saved.  Lead glass windows throughout the house were carefully unstuck and cleaned.

My entire job filled only 40 contractor bags.  I looked at every material with its reuse in mind.  Old appliances, cabinets and porcelain went to Restore to support Habitats for Humanity.  All paper, glass, metal and plastic came back to Brooklyn to be recycled. Best of all, my new old house retained the great warmth of age that I love and respect.

Until next time,

Garbage Girl