More Precious Now Than Ever Before

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Since 1916, The National Parks Service has been preserving the natural beauty of our country’s diverse environments, educating us about their value and protecting them from the negative influence of industrialism and capitalism.  The NPS is charged with the dual role of preserving the ecological and historical integrity of the places entrusted to its management, while also making them accessible for public use and enjoyment.

Climate Change is easily experienced in our National Parks.   In response, the National Parks Service created the Green Parks Plan to directly record the causes and effects. The plan’s “call to action” details goals like being energy and water smart, committing to buying green, and making the grounds themselves more sustainable.  By dedicating themselves to direct action, The National Park Service is taking another big step in their goal to maintain and protect our most precious resources.

In 2015, the National Parks Services decreased water use by 13%, diverted 50% of its waste away from landfills, and decreased energy emissions by 11% .

Interior Secretary, Ryan Zinke,  cut spending at the department by 13%; meaning 4,000 fewer employees at NPS, 3,800 positions cut at the EPA, and 2,000 fewer jobs at the State Department.

Zinke, during a meeting with oil executives, described these reductions as career bureaucrats who were obstacles to his plans for widespread drilling.  He went on to state that these employees were disloyal to the nation itself.

During this time of harsh changes in the way America was devotedly taking care of its resources, a look to the future is a must.  If we need to give away our most precious resources in order to maintain our lifestyles, then we need to ask ourselves what is gained by choosing to reduce ourselves in this way.  This could be a time where we get excited about shifting our wants and desires to better match our ability to live happy, productive lives.

Once the extraction industries take control of our Public Lands, the most remote places on earth will go away.  Martin and I will be joining our friends, Stuart and Mike to cross-country ski Yellowstone National Park this winter.  We consider this a once in a lifetime experience to be in a natural setting with natural sounds, natural smells, natural light, and a natural sky over our heads.  Nature will do what it wants with us.  We will get to experience what that feels like.

When I returned from rafting the Colorado River in the Grand Canyon, I found it very challenging to return to the same wants and desires I had three weeks prior to that special experience.

When Martin and I picked up the plastic littered in Jamaica Bay, I couldn’t see plastic ever again as a miracle to modern living and our convenience.

Take a moment to reflect what brings happiness to you.  Challenge yourself to break free of the routines you developed.  See yourself with the potential of that person before you became part of “The Race”.  This time is so much bigger than us.

Until next time,

Garbage Girl

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Rwanda and Kenya Plastic Pollution Leaders

Plastic bags get buried in the sand and become part of the beach.

Rwanda and Kenya are leading the world by eliminating a familiar problem: billions of plastic bags choking waterways and destroying entire ecosystems.  To fight this evil, all non-biodegradable plastic is banned from these countries.

At Kigali International Airport, a sign warns visitors that plastic bags will be confiscated.  Agents from the Rwanda Environment Management Authority (REMA) inspect travelers’ suitcases and discard all plastic films. Throughout the country, businesses have been forced to replace plastic carrier bags with paper ones.  The ban was a bold move. It paid off with an obvious improvement in clean countrysides, roadways, and water.

https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2014/feb/15/rwanda-banned-plastic-bags-so-can-we

The United Nations, has begun a #CleanSeas campaign to eliminate the use of plastic microbeads and single-use plastic bags by 2022.   With more than 40 countries acting now to help meet this goal, there is no excuse for the rest of the world to wait.

Many other countries, states and cities are in the news because they are trying to deal with this horrific issue.

England imposed a 5-pence charge on plastic bags in 2015 and usage dropped 85 percent in the first nine months!

California became the first American state to ban plastic bags, in 2014.  State laws are slow to pass.  See where your state stands in the Ban the Bag push.   http://www.bagtheban.com/in-your-state

Gov. Andrew Cuomo blocked a New York City bill in 2014 to impose a 5-cent fee on plastic bags because less advantaged people would be unfairly targeted and the NYC economy is dependent on consumer convenience.  Early this year, Mr. Cuomo formed a task force to create passable legislation. That law cannot come soon enough.  The New York Department of Sanitation collects an average of 1,700 tons of plastic bags per week, costing $12.5 million per year in disposal expenses.    https://www.nytimes.com/2017/02/14/nyregion/cuomo-blocks-new-york-city-plastic-bag-law.html?mcubz=1

No bag is free of an environmental impact, whether that’s contributing to climate change, ocean pollution, water scarcity, or pesticide use. We tend to favor reusable bags in an attempt to reduce our chronic overconsumption, but they come with many associated problems.

Considering what we put in the bag at the store (unnecessary packaging, meat, products wrapped in plastic, single use products) and how we discard or use the bag after its achieved its original purpose has a real impact on the environment.

     
These books will open up a whole new world.  Color photographs, maps, and graphics explore one of the planet’s most dynamic environments—from tourist beaches to Arctic beaches strewn with ice chunks to steaming hot tropical shores.  The World’s Beaches tells how beaches work, explains why they vary so much, and shows how dramatic changes can occur on them in a matter of hours.  It discusses tides, waves, and wind; the patterns of dunes, washover fans, and wrack lines; and the shape of berms, bars, shell lags, cusps, ripples, and blisters.  This fascinating, comprehensive guide also considers the future of beaches, and explains how extensively people have affected them—from coastal engineering to pollution, oil spills, and rising sea levels.  The Beach Book tells sunbathers why beaches widen and narrow, and helps boaters and anglers understand why tidal inlets migrate.  It gives home buyers insight into erosion rates and provides natural-resource managers and interested citizens with rich information on beach nourishment and coastal-zone development.

Until next time,  

Garbage Girl

Lobster Die Off Finally Explained?

Baby Lobster Die Off in Baja, California

Molecular biologist Hans Laufer, of the University of Connecticut, has discovered that waterborne chemicals leached from plastics and detergents seem to contribute to “shell disease,” which has caused huge dieoffs among lobsters of Long Island Sound during the past ten years.  According to University of Connecticut, after three years and $3 million invested in a research initiative, Laufer found that chemicals such as bisphenol A (BPA) are interfering with growth hormones in young lobsters, slowing their molting patterns and changing their development, which then leads to deformations, susceptibility to disease, and for many, death. This seems to explain a huge lobster dieoff that began in the late 1990s, bringing lobster catches to about 1/6 of their 1998 levels.

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