Where Does a Used Plastic Cup Go?

A plastic cup that was used once for probably less than a minute?  About 450-1000 years will pass before it decomposes in the ground.  That’s if it made it to a landfill.

Plastic is made from petroleum or natural gas.  Plastic production is estimated to use 8 percent of yearly global oil production—both as the raw material and for energy in the manufacturing process.  Because plastics embody energy from fossil fuels (and actually have a higher energy value than coal), leaving so much of it in landfills is not only an environmental hazard, it’s an unconscionable waste of a valuable resource.

If it ends up in the water, it will keep breaking down into smaller and smaller pieces that our marine life will ingest.  And eventually end up back in you.  If the plankton are eating plastic then you are eating plastic.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=97XpXhCgtEQ

Start saying, “NO!” to that plastic cup.  You will feel tons better!

Until next time,

Garbage Girl

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When You Have That Plastic Bottle

More fun to watch the cleverness of this post!!!

Single use plastic should be avoided at all times to send a clear signal to the producers of these horrible products that are harming every ecosystem in devastating ways.

The latest evidence of the harm these bottles are doing to our environment is the saddest ever!  North Face and many other environmentally friendly companies have been making polar fleece from recycled plastic bottles.  The unfortunate truth of this process is that we need to wash these garments.  All polyester and polyester polymer fabrics release micro fibers from our washing machine rinse cycles straight into our waterways.  Civic filter systems cannot remove these tiny fibers.  Once in our waterways, they are ingested by oysters, mussels, lobsters and other marine life that we eat.

Can it get much more sad?

Until next time,

Garbage Girl

The Best Way To Rethink Waste

These are the Top Ten single use items collected, on one day, each fall, when volunteers around the world participate in the Ocean Conservancy’s Annual International Coastal Cleanup Day.  The next one is Saturday, September 16.
https://oceanconservancy.org/trash-free-seas/international-coastal-cleanup/

According to the Ocean Conservancy, 275 metric tons of single use plastic waste becomes 100 metric tons of single use plastic waste on our coastlines and 8 metric tons of that single use plastic waste enters our oceans.  With 2 billion people living within 30 miles of our coastlines; we let 1 in 30 single use plastic items enter our world’s oceans.

When you stand in front of that “convenience” store refrigerator, before you reach for that beverage, take a moment to think about what you are actually looking at.

Try one day without buying any single use plastic.  Ask for your deli sandwich to be wrapped in paper and leave the plastic clamshell for the deli to deal with.  They bought it.  Choose a glass or aluminum container for your beverage or better yet, bring a reusable one with you.   If you do find yourself making bad choices or if you are not faster than that lightning-fast deli server, bring all of the trash home with you. Take responsibility for it. You bought it.

Observe the kind of waste you create, and think how you can change to reduce it.

Challenge yourself to reduce your waste each day.  Its really fun!  And you won’t believe how good it feels!

Follow and support the growing number of responsible institutions, states and governments who just stopped being crazy.

Vancouver Aquarium Bans Plastic Bottles

Until next time,

Garbage Girl